Tag: blockchain

Reconciling Privacy and Internet Freedom with Blockchain

Expert View: Reconciling Privacy and Internet Freedom with Blockchain by Alice Bonasio (Medium)

The past few months have seen a handful of data scandals emerge that have finally demonstrated to Brits the intrinsic value that their data holds, and the risks that come with giving it away so…

Post from Alice Bonacio discussing a possible future connection between privacy, security, and blockchain uses.
Bonacio posits “with privacy becoming an increasing concern, but users reluctant to sacrifice the ease of use that Internet freedom allows them, blockchain offers a solution to reconcile data protection with simplicity without the need for regulation.”
I know that blockchain is a frequent source of ridicule, but I do see a future in which users could have one page on the Internet that they use as their virtual CV, and this is fueled by a distributed, headless ledger system. I just don’t have the time, expertise, or coding chops to make this happen. If you do…send me a note. 🙂

Until recently, we have given our data away because we either didn’t realise we were doing so, or because we perceive it to be a small price to pay for an easy transaction. Data that holds value for all sorts of companies can be collected from any manner of online interactions; from a baking video you liked on Facebook, to the tube stop that you tap in at every morning with your contactless card.

 

It is clearly time for a shift in the way we view our data, and crucially, the way we secure it. Blockchain technology provides a solution that safeguards data without sacrificing any of the functionality that a free and open Internet provides. Blockchain is essentially a vast, distributed, ledger where data is stored across a web of different devices, rather than in one centralised place that makes it vulnerable to hacking. Most essentially, blockchain relies on sophisticated cryptography to ensure that all the data it stores is safely encrypted.

 

Candidates can then apply for jobs with a CV that is trusted and credible but; moreover, they are safe in the knowledge that their data is securely held. They can use their own biometric data to share the data they want, when they want, and they can employ smart contracts to dictate how long their data is accessible to the people they’ve shared it with, such as recruiters or potential employers.

Blockchain is not only crappy technology but a bad vision for the future

Blockchain is not only crappy technology but a bad vision for the future by Kai Stinchcombe (Medium)

Blockchain is not only crappy technology but a bad vision for the future. Its failure to achieve adoption to date is because systems built…

Kai Stinchcombe notes:

Blockchain is not only crappy technology but a bad vision for the future. Its failure to achieve adoption to date is because systems built on trust, norms, and institutions inherently function better than the type of no-need-for-trusted-parties systems blockchain envisions. That’s permanent: no matter how much blockchain improves it is still headed in the wrong direction.

 

There is no single person in existence who had a problem they wanted to solve, discovered that an available blockchain solution was the best way to solve it, and therefore became a blockchain enthusiast.

Albert Wenger on the Decentralized Future

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3EBcmQZCZw&feature=youtu.be&t=6m40s
Sent to me by Hannah Gerber on Facebook:

An interesting perspective by Albert Wenger on how we can bring regulation out of the industrial age and into the digital age. We need digitally native approaches if we want to create a more decentralized future and create genuine competition amongst the tech giants. The idea of mandatory end user API keys for social and search systems is intriguing.

Some notes from the video:

  • We need to recognize that attention is the major currency of the future. We need to realize the attention hogs that our social networks have become. We also need to realize that these networks/businesses hog our attention, and build their own value.
  • We need to make changes of a regulatory…and a self-regulatory nature to address current and possible futures.
  • We have super computers in our pocket, we’re connected to the global economy. But, when we open up our phone, and launch Facebook…we give up all control.
  • Psychological freedom – We know that is we walk down the street and see a cat, we see a cat. But, online we have algorithms that double and triple down on our desire to see cats…so they show us hundreds of cats per day to suck up our attention and keep us on their app/platform.
  • An online identity that I control…that is not the property of a business (Google/Facebook/Amazon). This is an identity that we use to control and leverage our digital identities.

A lot of great points that resonate with me. I think there is a need to create our one domain, or series of canonical URLs. I’m in the process of changing my signals to control more of my value and attention. Attention referring to my attention on my reading online…and attention of my audience/PLN to what I’m doing/working/thinking/playing.

Why Do We Need Blockchain Technologies in Education?

Why Do We Need Blockchain Technologies in Education? by Vesa | (NewsBTC)

There is a real buzz around new EdTech companies such as NTOK.io at the moment. They are creating a future vision of global learning and tuition that uses

This post is a bit of a commercial for certain companies, but it is also a good overview of the thinking that continues behind blockchain.

There is a real buzz around new EdTech companies such as NTOK.io at the moment. They are creating a future vision of global learning and tuition that uses blockchain technology at its core. Although EdTech is in its early stages, it’s likely that education will be disrupted in the same way that FinTech has changed the financial world. Cryptocurrency transactions are made secure by blockchain technology allowing for significant decentralization of finances. In other words, the big banks and governments no longer have power over finances. The blockchain makes all data transactions untraceable, including financial ones. If we extend this idea of secured blockchain currency and data transactions to EdTech, it’s clear to see that this will transform education into something far more democratic.