Tag: pedagogy

Things That Matter

WELCOME
Things That Matter
Digitally Lit #251 – 6/20/2020

Hi all, welcome to issue #251 of Digitally Literate. Each week in this newsletter, I synthesize the news of the week in education, technology, & literacy. If you haven’t already, please subscribe if you would like this newsletter to show up in your inbox. Feel free to reach out and let me know what you think of this work at hello@digitallyliterate.net.

I was involved in two pieces this week:

Watch

Facial Recognition: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver

 

John Oliver takes a look at facial recognition technology, how it’s used by private companies and law enforcement, and why it can be dangerous.

IBM, Microsoft, and Amazon all announced pauses on their facial recognition tech last week. Part of the reason is the racial bias inherently built into these systems and the impact on Black lives.

Read

Trump Can’t Immediately End DACA, Supreme Court Rules

DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals), protects people brought to the United States as children by shielding them from deportation and letting them work.

The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the Trump administration may not immediately proceed with its plan to end a program protecting about 700,000 young immigrants known as Dreamers from deportation.

This ruling has important implications for educational settings, and has been shown to ease transition into adulthood for these youth.

What Anti-racist Teachers Do Differently

They view the success of black students as central to the success of their own teaching.

To fight against systemic racism means to buck norms. Educators at every level must be willing to be uncomfortable in their struggle for black students, recognizing students’ power and feeding it by honoring their many contributions to our schools.

Pride Month goes digital: Why spirit of Pride will still prevail

LGBTQ communities in the US and around the world celebrate Pride in June to commemorate the Stonewall riots and pride in being who they are. This year, Pride celebrations have moved online and many have focused on supporting racial justice.

Without in-person Pride events this year, there are questions about how to support the LGBTQ community, specifically the people who don’t have supportive families.

The FBI used a Philly protester’s Etsy profile, LinkedIn, and other internet history to charge her with setting police cars ablaze

I write and teach about privacy, security, and the digital breadcrumbs we leave behind as we live online and off. In this, I’ve asked the question about the groups that collect this data, and the algorithms that make sense of it all. Who is doing the collecting…and who is buying, or using this info?

This story details the the intricate trail of breadcrumbs Philadelphia police used to track a protester through her social media history and online shopping patterns.

The path took agents from Instagram, where amateur photographers also captured shots of the masked arsonist, to an Etsy shop that sold the distinctive T-shirt the woman was wearing in the video. It led investigators to her LinkedIn page, to her profile on the fashion website Poshmark, and eventually to her doorstep in Germantown.

Why Do People Avoid Facts That Could Help Them?

As COVID-19 rages across the U.S., I’m often enraged when I see people choosing not to wear masks in public. This post shares information on why some people choose to remain ignorant about information that would benefit them when it’s painful—and sometimes when it’s pleasurable.

Much of this guidance comes from a scale to measure people’s relative aversion to potentially unpleasant but also potentially useful information developed by Emily Ho and colleagues.

Make

Perk Up Your Iced Coffee With Cocktail Bitters

In this newsletter, we regularly examine opportunities to make things in the kitchen. This is especially true when it comes to ways to caffeinate.

This post examines the many uses of cocktail bitters.

If that doesn’t totally turn you off…perhaps you’d also like to examine fat-washing your whisky. 😉

Consider

consider

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.

Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Digitally Literate is a weekly review of the news, notes, tips, and tricks from the week that resonated with me.

This week I need this opportunity to laugh at myself.

Connect at hello@digitallyliterate.net or on the social network of your choice.

Preparing For The Storm

WELCOME
Preparing for the storm
Digitally Lit #246 – 5/16/2020

Hi all, welcome to issue #246 of Digitally Literate.

This week I hosted the NCTE Twitter chat with Robyn Seglem on Literacy in Digital Times. You can read the archive of this chat here.

I also helped post the following:

If you haven’t already, please subscribe if you would like this newsletter to show up in your inbox. Feel free to reach out and let me know what you think of this work at hello@digitallyliterate.net.

Watch

Getting Started With Trauma-Informed Practices

 

When teachers use strategies tailored to children who have experienced trauma, all students reap the emotional and academic benefits.

Read

The Single Most Essential Requirement in Designing a Fall Online Course

Cathy Davidson detailing the key mindset as we begin to think about learning environments in the fall.

We need to be human first, professor second. We need to design as humans for humans in a global crisis. We need to design our courses with the awareness of pain, dislocation, uncertainty, and trauma now central to all our lives. It’s a lot to ask. It is the one and only essential as we design our courses for this disrupted fall.

Values-Centered Instructional Planning

Robin DeRosa on the need to be guided by a consistent, mission-aligned framework as we move from coping to planning for the fall and beyond.

What is missing from most of the remote teaching contingency planning is a framework for helping the people inside institutions understand and make decisions about pedagogy from inside the pandemic’s evolving reality. Pedagogy is not an ancillary or optional part of conversations about remote teaching. Pedagogy is the category that describes how we teach. For that reason, whether we foreground it or not, pedagogy is a key part of how our learners understand and assess their experience at our institutions during this crisis.

The Risks – Know Them – Avoid Them

As you begin to make plans to go back out in public…or ease social distancing…please read this.

This is especially helpful for those that sit on taskforces developing plans to move to F2F in the fall.

The storm we can’t see

A look at the coming/current economic fallout.

Universities are forfeiting room and board fees, lucrative spring sports seasons and the elective surgeries at teaching hospitals that balance their budgets. Many — if not all — colleges and universities will probably have to nix the fall semester. Across the country, it’s easy to imagine that the nation’s 4,000 colleges and universities might require a $200 billion bailout just to finish out the calendar year.

Approaches to Open Education and Social Justice Research

Sarah Lambert and Laura Czerniewicz guest edited a special themed issue on open education and social justice.

While open education has traditionally been about increasing access, it has become clear that removing barriers is complex and that “participatory parity” as the aim of socially just education needs a nuanced examination.

Make

25 Strategies to Engage Students on Your Next Zoom Meeting

These strategies are not meant to take the place of deeper learning. That kind of learning is generally better when done with a mix of asynchronous and synchronous conversations and discussions.

These are not Zoom-specific…it’s just what most of you are using. 🙂

Consider

consider

Anything that’s human is mentionable, and anything that is mentionable can be more manageable. When we can talk about our feelings, they become less overwhelming, less upsetting, and less scary. The people we trust with that important talk can help us know that we are not alone.

Fred Rogers

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Digitally Literate is a weekly review of the news, notes, tips, and tricks from the week that resonated with me.

When Will This Be Over? Sesame Workshop’s Tips For Parenting During A Pandemic can help.

Connect at hello@digitallyliterate.net or on the social network of your choice.

Self-preservation, not self-indulgence

WELCOME
Self-preservation, not self-indulgence
Digitally Lit #239 – 3/28/2020**

Hi all, welcome back. I hope all is well with you…and those around you.

Last week I talked about the Online Learning Collective Facebook Group that I helped start up. As of this morning, there are almost 23,000 members in the group. We’re also painfully aware that not all love Facebook. To that end, we’re reaching out to Twitter, and Instagram. I also moved our website to a new location. We’ve been getting a lot of traction in the news.

I continue to build out learning events in our mentored, open online learning community. Specifically, I built these:

I also posted two episodes of the Technopanic Podcast:

If you haven’t already, please subscribe if you would like this newsletter to show up in your inbox. Feel free to reach out and let me know what you think of this work at hello@digitallyliterate.net.

Watch

Let’s Play: Angle Vocabulary Review (in Half Life: Alyx)

 

Half-Life: Alyx is a virtual reality game.

Charles Coomber, a San Diego-based teacher at Otay Ranch Academy for the Arts, used Half Life: Alyx, as a makeshift whiteboard to teach math. Pretty cool.

Read

5 ways to keep human connections when moving learning online due to coronavirus

Let’s not lose high touch when we move to high tech.

Here’s 5 ways to keep it human:

  • Simplify & be flexible
  • Don’t assume people have reliable tech, or understand how to use it
  • Look for ways to build community
  • Don’t be afraid to crowdsource ideas
  • Keep the big picture in mind

I recommend this resource on 14 tips for connecting with others that have limited Internet resources.

It is important that we think first about student agency in these times. This series of interviews with experts in the field (most of you are readers of this newsletter 🙂 ) is a great reflection point.

That Discomfort You’re Feeling Is Grief

It’s important to acknowledge the grief you may be feeling, how to manage it, and how we can find meaning in it.

We all have different levels of grief and express it in different ways.

A couple ways to acknowledge & deal with this anxiety & grief:

  • find balance in the things you’re thinking;
  • calm yourself by coming into the present;
  • let go of what you can’t control;
  • stock up on compassion.

What It’s Like to Quarantine With Kids

I had a recent interview with Joshua Brustein from Bloomberg. Here’s some of results from that fun discussion.

On the topic of screentime, this piece from Dorian Traube and Ashwini Lakshmanan at The Conversation is great. The focus is on tele-health and children.

Make “work from home” work for you

This is primarily an ad for Google Apps, but it provides a ton of great principles to consider as you think about how to make “work from home” work for you. You can find the same info here in a different context.

#1 tip for mental health: Work at home doesn’t mean working all of the time.

  • Designate your “spot” for working
  • Use video chat like a pro
  • Practice “one tab working”
  • Act the part
  • Play with your schedule & energy
  • Don’t work all of the time
  • Create “to-do list” the day before
  • Finish one thing per day
  • Cut yourself some slack

How to Clean and Disinfect All Your Gadgets

Make time in your schedule to clean & disinfect all of your gadgets this weekend. Seriously. We need you to stay healthy at home.

Whether you want to protect against COVID-19 or just give all your gadgets a deep-clean while you’re stuck at home, now’s the ideal time! Here’s how you can safely clean your tech gadgets, without damaging anything.

Make

Speak your story

As a member of the Online Learning Collective, we’d love to hear your story during these trying times.

We started up a Speakpipe on our website to record 90 second messages about how you’ve been impacted personally and/or professionally. I’ll upload all of these messages to the Internet Archive.

Please take time to document this time. Please share with others.

Consider

consider

Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare.

audre lorde

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Digitally Literate is a weekly review of the news, notes, tips, and tricks from the week that resonated with me. I leave a trail of digital breadcrumbs. Feel free to pay attention if you’d like to check my notes. 🙂

Find your corner in the forest.

Connect at hello@digitallyliterate.net or on the social network of your choice.

Digitally Literate #237

WELCOME
The Knapsack Problem
Digitally Lit #237 – 3/14/2020**

Hi all, welcome to issue #237 of Digitally Literate.

I posted and shared the following this week:

If you haven’t already, please subscribe if you would like this newsletter to show up in your inbox. Feel free to reach out and let me know what you think of this work at hello@digitallyliterate.net.

Watch

Think Like A Coder – TED-Ed Playlist

Think Like a Coder is a 10-episode series that will challenge viewers with programming puzzles as the main characters— a girl and her robot companion— attempt to save a world that has been plunged into turmoil. In our digital age, coding has become a basic literacy skill which gives us a deeper understanding of the technology we use everyday.

Follow along with the lessons for episode one on the TED-Ed website.

I’m using this as a challenge with my kids as we’re remaining sequestered over the next week or so.

Read

Times which Require Greater Care: Ethos in Online Learning

Communities across the globe are feeling the effects of the Coronavirus this week. In fact, if you’re sick and tired of reading about COVID-19, I don’t blame you. I’ll try and provide a balanced mixture of info about the global pandemic as I share the news of the week.

One of the most insightful pieces about planning for instruction as educational institutions move to online only offerings comes from Sean Michael Morris.

The post shares valuable insight on the ethos, or the what and why of online pedagogy, as opposed to just focusing on the how.

Plus, the post begins with this image. 🙂

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If you’re looking for resources on addressing engaging youth in these times, this resource from the NY Times will regularly update with projects. I also recommend this resource on making sure your learning materials are accessible for all. If you’re in higher ed, please help document your experiences.

Coronavirus will also cause a loneliness epidemic

Earlier this week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued guidelines for “community mitigation strategies” to limit the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, which include recommendations for “social distancing”—a term that epidemiologists are using to refer to a conscious effort to reduce close contact between people and hopefully stymie community transmission of the virus.

Ezra Klein indicates that this may prevent the pandemic from worsening, but it may also cause a “social recession” in which populations already vulnerable to isolation and loneliness may be at extreme risk.

In earlier issues of this newsletter, we’ve examined the possible negative impacts of digital, social spaces on human relationships and mental health. As I connect with others online, I’m encouraged by what I see, but also trying to identify ways to support the mental health of others…and stay connected.

What does a screen do?

As a member of the Screentime Research Group, I spend a lot of time thinking, talking, and writing about the challenges of living and learning in the age of screens.

This post in Slate by jane c. hu indicates that the research that examines screentime and behavior is difficult to design and difficult to execute, leaving us with fewer causal conclusions and more associative studies to rely on for decision-making and policy.

How the Mathematical Conundrum Called the ‘Knapsack Problem’ Is All Around Us

The knapsack problem is a fictional dilemma in which you are constrained to fill a fixed-size knapsack with your most valuable items.

This thought experiment is providing new opportunities for engaging in computing and processing tasks. It also gives us an opportunity to think about computational thinking and real-life problems.

Humans may have a problem with optimizing multiple, smaller problems as they are faced with “choice overload.” But, humans are also need to pay attention to everything, while also ignoring some data. We’ve learned how to store only the most pertinent stimuli in our mental knapsacks as we go through the day. Computers aren’t there…yet. 🙂

Build Trust in your team with SCARF

Google crunched the data on hundreds of high-performing teams, and found that one variable mattered more than any other: “emotional safety.” Also known as: “psychological security.” Also known as trust.

So how do you build trust and psychological safety in your team? Researcher David Rock has carefully studied the brain science of trust and engagement at work, and breaks it down into 5 key ingredients — summed up by the cozy acronym “SCARF:”

Status: A sense of importance and belonging.
Certainty: Clarity. An ability to predict what will happen.
Autonomy: Agency. A sense of freedom and control. Being treated like an adult.
Relationships: Connecting on a personal level. Feeling like we know each other.
Fairness: The rules are fairly applied. Things are fair and above-board.

Make

Don’t blame tech for your distracted brain. Take control.

These three tactics will help you focus on the task at hand.

  • Reimagining the trigger as a sensation of curiosity
  • Reimagining the task itself
  • Avoiding self-limiting beliefs regarding your temperament

Consider

consider

Every problem has in it the seeds of its own solution. If you don’t have any problems, you don’t get any seeds.

Norman Vincent Peale

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Digitally Literate is a weekly review of the news, notes, tips, and tricks from the week that resonated with me. I leave a trail of digital breadcrumbs. Feel free to pay attention if you’d like to check my notes. 🙂

Help encourage others to wash their hands with this infographic maker.

Connect at hello@digitallyliterate.net or on the social network of your choice.

The Number of Students Taking Online Courses Is Quickly Rising

The Number of Students Taking Online Courses Is Quickly Rising, But Perceptions Are Changing Slowly (EdSurge)

Online course offerings in the United States have expanded. In both K12 and higher education options for students to take whole courses, blended courses and—in some places—entire degree programs online are more prevalent than ever.

Research presented in EdSurge, but here is the real takeaway. Bad teaching is bad teaching…online or off.

Patrick R. Lowenthal, an associate professor of educational technology at Boise State University, notes that he was one of those professors who began to view online learning more favorably after engaging with the medium back on 2001. Since then he has been teaching courses for graduates online, a medium he admits he was hesitant to engage in before.
Lowenthal has also researched student perceptions of online learning in the past, finding that learners tend to give such courses more negative evaluations than in-person courses. He says that the findings may represent the lack of experience some educators have teaching in online classrooms. He expects that to change over time, noting that good teachers in person will eventually become good teachers online.
“I will be at a dinner party, and someone will ask what I do. Then they will mention taking one online course and hating it. Then they want to talk to me for 45 minutes about how bad online learning is,” says Lowenthal. “The problem with that is we don’t do the same thing with face to face. We have all had some really bad teachers and courses, but we don’t sit there and act like all face to face learning is horrible because of it.”
Lowenthal also notes that these days the term online learning is more ubiquitous than ever. Some even call it “digital learning” because it can mean learning on a laptop, tablet or smartphone. And, thanks to live video, it can also be face-to-face (at least sort-of), giving opportunities for students to connect in ways they couldn’t when he first started teaching.
“Some people say, you’re not actually learning online. Your learning is taking place in your brain,” Lowenthal explains. “So why do we focus so much on the platform?”

A study exploring the impact of lecture capture availability and lecture capture usage on student attendance and attainment

A study exploring the impact of lecture capture availability and lectu (SpringerLink)

Lecture capture is widely used within higher education as a means of recording lecture material for online student viewing. However, there is some uncertainty around whether this is a uniformly…

Research from the International Journal of Higher Education Research.
A lot of interesting findings from this research that point to challenges for online, blended/hybrid, and face-to-face learning.
Very interesting that lecture capture has no impact on attainment of content or attendance. Generally there is a strong negative impact of lecture capture on all aspects of classroom performance.
This has been my challenge. I create lecture captures to help students that may be absent. But, my primary reasons are: transparency, supporting English Language Learners, scaffolding students with special needs…and people learn at different speeds (some students might want to scrub through a lecture and figure out what they missed). I think there is a need to explain the “why” to students…and explain the “why” to faculty.
The full abstract:

Lecture capture is widely used within higher education as a means of recording lecture material for online student viewing. However, there is some uncertainty around whether this is a uniformly positive development for students. The current study examines the impact of lecture capture introduction and usage in a compulsory second year research methods module in a undergraduate BSc degree. Data collected from a matched cohort before (N = 161) and after (N = 160) lecture capture introduction showed that attendance substantially dropped in three matched lectures after capture became available. Attendance, which predicts higher attainment (controlling for students’ previous grade and gender), mediates a negative relationship between lecture capture availability and attainment. Lecture capture viewing shows no significant relationship with attainment whilst factoring in lecture attendance; capture viewing also fails to compensate for the impact that low attendance has on attainment. Thus, the net effect of lecture capture introduction on the cohort is generally negative; the study serves as a useful example (that can be communicated students) of the pitfalls of an over-reliance on lecture capture as a replacement for lecture attendance.

A Framework for Teaching with Twitter

A Framework for Teaching with Twitter (chronicle.com)

One point I’d like to emphasize with this matrix is that there is no single right way to teach with Twitter. And there’s no wrong way either. You don’t even have to use Twitter with the same rhythm or intent over the span of the semester; you can range across the passive-active and monologic-dialogic axes as it makes sense for your and your students’ needs.

Fandom, Feminism, and Maker Pedagogy

Fandom, Feminism, and Maker Pedagogy – Hybrid Pedagogy by Hannah McGregor (Hybrid Pedagogy)

Maker pedagogy can be a political, and even radical, approach to learning. The best learning experiences emerge when students approach making as an exploratory and self-reflexive process that brings them into closer conversation with the concerns of the course.

And herein lies my concern. I actually think that the best learning experiences emerge when students approach making not only as the acquisition of a marketable set of skills (though I have nothing against skill-acquisition in itself) but as an exploratory and self-reflexive process that brings them into closer conversation with the concerns of the course. The “best”-ness of those learning experiences emerges when my concerns and goals enter into dialogue with those of my students: I want them to be activists, they want to be publishers, but in the best case scenario we collectively learn about the productive spaces where publishing and activism might overlap. In this sense, I share Ben Harley’s understanding of “education as an event — an unpredictable engagement between students, material, and instructor — that takes place within the confines of the university.”

Instructional Designers Are Teachers

Instructional Designers Are Teachers – Hybrid Pedagogy by Sean Michael Morris (Hybrid Pedagogy)

The future of digital learning depends on taking seriously the work of instructional designers as teachers, both by pushing them to be more and acknowledging when they are far more than we realized.

 At the root of what they do is a maddening desire to create meaningful learning experiences in digital space.
 
Instructional designers, then, understand digital space. They understand learning. They understand teaching. And they understand technology.
 
The future of digital learning, which is the Tinman to the Dorothy of higher education, depends on taking seriously the work of instructional designers as teachers, both by pushing them to be more and acknowledging when they are far more than we realized.