Tag: social media

Digitally Literate #204

The quiet part out loudDigitally Lit #204 – 7/6/2019 Hi all, my name is Ian O’Byrne and welcome to issue #204 of Digitally Literate. In this newsletter I distill the news of the week in technology into an easy-to-read resource. Thank you for reading. Please subscribe if you haven’t already. This week I was working…

Social Media Are a Mass Shooter’s Best Friend

Ian Bogost on how technology platforms police content. Global internet services were designed to work this way, and there might be no escape from their grip. The internet was designed to resist the efforts of any central authority to control its content—even when a few large, wealthy companies control the channels by which most users…

Social Media Is a Weapon of War

Social Media Is a Weapon of War. How We Use It Is Up to Us (Motherboard)

“‘Win’ the internet, [and] you can win silly feuds, elections, and deadly serious battles.”

David Axe in Motherboard. All annotations in context. Trump’s unlikely rise to the White House was symptomatic of social, political, and technological trends decades in the making—trends that gave rise to the internet and social media and which, in turn, transformed the way we control, spy on, and kill each other. It is interesting to…

My Affair With the Intellectual Dark Web

My Affair With the Intellectual Dark Web – Great Escape – Medium by Meghan Daum (Medium)

This is the story of the past three years of my life. It’s romance in a way, but it’s also a breakup story. It begins sometime in 2015, a year during which my life was coming apart in various ways…

An insightful piece from Megan Daum about the passion and obsession that usually comes through our social media feeds. Maybe it was the impending loss of Obama that caused us to begin this unconscious process of detachment — from one another as well as from him. Maybe we knew we’d never be in love like this again,…

6 types of misinformation circulated this election season

6 types of misinformation circulated this election season

Claire Wardle in the Columbia Journalism Review. All annotations in context. The New Yorker’s Sasha Frere-Jones called Twitter a “self-cleaning oven,” suggesting that false information could be flagged and self-corrected almost immediately. We no longer had to wait 24 hours for a newspaper to issue a correction.   Jeff Jarvis wrote over the weekend, we need to be careful…

Repurposing talks on social media

Thread by @dsquintana: “You’ve worked hard putting together a presentation so why limit it to the people sitting in your talk? Here are a few tips for repurposing y […]”

Are you guilty of ‘orbiting’?

Are you guilty of ‘orbiting’? It may be hurting your relationships. (NBC News)

The trend of someone leaving your life, but still appearing in your online world, can hinder the ability to heal.

A piece on “orbiting” or a “strategic way to prevent the door from shutting completely on a former relationship.” I didn’t know what to call it at the time, but in a recent piece for Man Repeller, writer Anna Lovine used the term “orbiting” to describe when a person leaves your life but still appears in…

How to Survive a Media Blitz: an Academic’s Guide

How to Survive a Media Blitz: an Academic’s Guide

Gather your team. You could try to handle the sudden attention by yourself. But you will be exhausted, irritable, and overwhelmed. And being exhausted, irritable, and overwhelmed is the surest way to end up making a public comment that you regret, whether it’s merely incoherent or reputation-destroying disastrous. So I strongly advise you to ask additional…

PBS NewsTracker

What is the NewsTracker? (PBS NewsHour)

As the country was reacting to the outcome of the 2016 Presidential election, concerns soared about the problems of misinformation or so-called “Fake News” spreading across social media. To understand the scale and shape of a problem that was incredibly opaque, we began intensive research to collect and analyze the sources of this misinformation.

First developed by PBS for internal use, NewsTracker is a tool that identifies Facebook pages that traffic in misinformation and tracks how often the content there is liked, shared, and on commented on. Reporters use this tool to find patterns and trends that may merit reporting. The tool will have a new home soon: the Shorenstein Center…